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6.11.4.1. Energy Demand

Four energy demand sectors have been identified in the UK Programme as areas where emission reduction measures can be effectively implemented.

1. Domestic energy consumption produced 42 MtC in 1990, equivalent to 27% of emissions. A reduction in emissions from this sector should be achieved with measures aimed at improving energy efficiency. They include: 8% VAT on domestic fuel (introduced in April 1994); financial assistance from the Energy Saving Trust and advice from local energy advice centres (LEACs); public awareness campaigns; and efficiency standards for energy use in buildings.

2. Energy consumption in the business sector was responsible for 48 MtC or 30% of CO2 emissions in 1990. During the 1990s, the aim has been to reduce emissions through the implementation of the Making a Corporate Commitment Campaign (involving over 1600 organisations), and promoting the use of the Energy Efficiency Office's advisory services (via the Best Practice Programme).

3. Energy consumption in the public sector resulted in 9.6 MtC in 1990. The aim has been to reduce energy consumption in the public sector by 20%.

4. Transport accounted for 24% of the UK's CO2 emissions in 1990, and this is forecast to rise to 26% by 2000. Emissions from this sector can be reduced through improved fuel efficiency of vehicles, increased fuel duties and increased use of public transport.