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6.4.6. Other Trace Gases

Other trace gases such as the nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO) and the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have little direct radiative impact on the atmosphere, but they can indirectly influence the chemistry and concentrations of certain greenhouse gases, particularly ozone. The major sources of these compounds are technological (fossil fuel combustion in power stations and transport) and biomass burning. For a more detailed discussion see Prather et al. (1995).